Rust, Python Requests Library and Freakonomics

May 21, 2015

  • Rust Language (The changelog)
    • safety without garbage collector
    • single ownership model (so cleanup is easy)
    • Transfer of ownership (permanent) or lending (temp)
    • Owner is supposed to cleanup
    • Better C++
    • C++ hackers can already do this stuff, but rust enables new/web programmers to systems programming
    • cargo (package management) - all (ex) C++ programmers (who now use rust) now like this
    • cargo - learn from other package managers like ruby, npm etc.

May 22, 2015

  • Talk python to me - Requests library
    • Kenneth talks about “Hallway” track being most helpful (for him?) in pycon.
    • python3 usage spiked significantly since last django release used it as default
    • writing all documentation/tutorials to use python3 could help adoption
    • Kenneth is happy with python2 personally
    • Kenneth says : “Who are the python3 users that bash everyone on HN/reddit - I don’t meet them at conferences, These are “new kids” who started directly with python3"
    • Personal favourite projects :

May 23-25, 2015

  • James Altucher talks to Steve Dubner (Freakonomics)
    • They talk about latest Freakonomics book, which is compilation of various previously published blog posts
    • about 120+ articles curated from 8500 posts
    • Dubner did something similar when he was at the New York times 100th anniv.
      • dubner met his wife (photographer) during this assignment
    • Cost of fearing strangers
      • Most of the damage (attack) done by people you know
      • A guy who used to dress as a santa killed his family (and himself)
      • A muslim family was taken off the flight for talking about “safest seats on the plane"
    • Levitt’s article about suggestions for terrorists created quite a stir on the first (?) day when freakonomics blog appeared on NYTimes site ;)
    • terrorists don’t need ideas from others, but people worry
    • Stories are important, just the data/results may be boring
      • The Bible is most read book, but only 15% people can remember all the 10 commandments

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